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Service designer

This apprenticeship is in development and is subject to change

Why is this apprenticeship not ready for delivery?

An apprenticeship is only available for delivery when both the standard and assessment plan is approved and a funding band (core government contribution) has been assigned to the standard.

How can I get involved?

If you'd like to get involved and contribute to the development of this apprenticeship, please read about developing standards and assessment plans. You can email the trailblazer contact using the details on this page.

Key information

  1. Status: In development
  2. Ticked Proposal approved
    Ticked Occupational standard approved
    Ticked End-point assessment plan approved
  3. Reference: ST0894
  4. Level: 6
  5. Degree: N/A
  6. Typical duration to gateway: 24 months
  7. Typical EPA period: 6 months
  8. Route: Business and administration
  9. Date updated: 30/11/2022
  10. EQA provider: Ofqual
  11. Review:

    This apprenticeship standard will be reviewed after three years

Print occupational standard

Details of the occupational standard

Occupation summary

This occupation is found in the private, public and third sector, local, national, and multinational organisations and employers. Relevant sectors include the health sector, finance sector, business and professional services, retail sector, technology sector, government, public sector, and the charity sector. There has been a growing demand for service design skills to be embedded within culture and governance structures to support future ways of working.

The broad purpose of the occupation is to improve/redesign services currently offered or develop/design new service propositions to meet the needs of the user as well as the business and other stakeholders. Service designers take a user-centred, collaborative and exploratory approach to design the new service, iterating toward implementation.

They work collaboratively with service/product owners and multidisciplinary teams; to (re)design services:
- from end to end (the start of a process to the very end step they take),
- from front to back (both user-facing and back office to create a seamless service) and
- cross-channel (to seamlessly and often interchangeably deliver the service through the various available platforms, which sometimes - but not always - include digital touch points).

In short, the purpose of a services designer is to (re)design services collaboratively and iteratively, taking a user-centred approach.

In their daily work, an employee in this occupation interacts with a wide range of internal stakeholders, from front-line staff to service managers, senior leaders to heads of the organisation. If involved in the research, they also interact with a range of external stakeholders, which may include members of the public and individuals working in other organisations. They may, in large organisations, report to programme boards and to shareholders in private sector organisations. They often work in collaboration with multidisciplinary teams (through formal or informal arrangement) which may include marketing, finance, communications, logistics, project management, HR, digital (developers, systems/solutions architects) and user research. 

Service Designers enable services to be (re)designed in a user/customer-centred way and therefore the most important stakeholder is the end user/service beneficiary.

An employee in this occupation will be responsible for guiding and facilitating the (re)design of a service, product, or solution; ensuring the work is user-centred. Increasingly, service designers design with the environment as a key stakeholder, creating services that serve the triple bottom line (profit, people, planet).

Service Designers are responsible for guiding, leading, facilitating and educating those involved in the (re)design, providing adequate challenge to ensure that they are responding to the right problem statement, that the scope of the work is appropriately sized and the limitations (i.e. with technology or the outcome an organisation wants to achieve) are understood to ensure anything (re)designed is viable.

They are responsible for selecting the most useful methodologies, tools, and techniques for use in the service design and continually work between a macro and micro view, ensuring the work has pace/is progressing and that the strategic view is not lost within the work.

Service Designers are expected to understand and contribute to budgets and return on investment considerations. In larger organisations, they may have management oversight of their own budgets.

Typical job titles include:

Experience designer Human-centred designer Service designer

Occupation duties

Duty KSBs

Duty 1 Question and challenge the design brief in order to lead, influence and guide stakeholders to determine the scope of the service design work, both strategically and operationally.

K1 K2 K10 K12 K16 K17 K19 K20 K21

S1 S2 S3 S4 S5 S9 S11 S18 S19 S20 S21 S22 S23 S25

B1 B2 B3 B4 B5 B6

Duty 2 Define and conduct research activities including primary/secondary research using both qualitative and quantitative data to fully understand users and their needs as well as the context of a service.

K1 K2 K3 K6 K15 K17 K18 K19

S1 S5 S6 S7 S8 S9 S14 S15 S17 S20 S22 S23

B1 B2 B3 B4 B5 B6

Duty 3 Synthesise research to build themes and clusters, find insights, and discover opportunity areas for improving the experience of the user.

K1 K2 K5 K6 K10 K16 K17 K18 K19

S8 S9 S11 S14 S15 S17 S18 S21 S22 S24

B1 B2 B3 B4 B5 B6

Duty 4 Analyse, interpret and communicate complex information or data sets from the research to build a case and direction for change.

K1 K2 K5 K6 K11 K12 K21

S1 S3 S4 S6 S8 S9 S15 S17 S18 S19 S20 S21 S22

B2 B5 B6

Duty 5 Develop multiple potential solutions to the design brief using ideation tools and techniques

K1 K2 K3 K4 K7 K9 K10 K15 K17 K19

S1 S3 S4 S5 S6 S10 S11 S15 S17 S18 S19 S21 S22 S24 S25

B2 B3 B4 B5 B6

Duty 6 Prototype, test with users and analyse potential solutions, making continuous improvements to designs and selecting ideas that best deliver the desired impact on a user’s experience of a service and the environmental and economic needs of the organisation.

K1 K2 K3 K4 K8 K9 K10 K12 K13 K14 K17 K19

S1 S3 S4 S5 S7 S8 S9 S11 S12 S13 S14 S15 S16 S17 S20 S21 S22 S24 S25

B1 B2 B3 B4 B5 B6

Duty 7 Direct the transition from prototype into pilot projects through working with the service areas who will take this forward and lead on-going evaluation, including creating clear success metrics for the improved service.

K1 K2 K8 K9 K10 K11 K12 K13 K14 K16 K17 K19 K20

S1 S4 S5 S8 S9 S11 S13 S14 S15 S16 S17 S18 S19 S21 S23 S25 S26

B1 B2 B3 B5 B6

Duty 8 Lead the design of services through engaging with and influencing stakeholders, colleagues, and service users.

K1 K3 K10 K11 K12 K17 K18 K19 K20 K21

S1 S5 S9 S15 S18 S19 S20 S21 S22 S23 S25 S26

B1 B2 B3 B5 B6

Duty 9 Develop others with the skills needed to contribute to the work through coaching, mentoring, shadowing, working collaboratively or delivering training.

K1 K2 K10 K12 K18 K19 K20

S1 S4 S5 S15 S16 S17 S18 S19 S20 S21 S22 S23 S24 S25 S26

B1 B4 B5

Duty 10 Manage time frames and guide budget decisions, working within organisational project management processes, and manage risks in order to meet business needs.

K1 K3 K10 K11 K12 K13 K14 K21

S1 S2 S11 S19 S20 S21 S22 S23 S25

B3 B5

Duty 11 Manage and lead ongoing change and identify individuals and groups who are able to make a case for a service design approach for future change requirements.

K1 K2 K3 K10 K12 K21

S1 S5 S18 S19 S20 S21 S22 S26

B2 B3 B5


KSBs

Knowledge

K1: The theory and history of the discipline of service design, including definitions and principles, the different perspectives, approaches, or schools of thought. Back to Duty

K2: How and when service design practices can be used to design and improve services. Back to Duty

K3: Other business areas and professions involved in the design of services such as research, UX, technology, policy, and delivery. Back to Duty

K4: The use of creative processes involved in design such as user-centred design approaches and design thinking methods. Back to Duty

K5: Approaches to mapping a service and when to use them. Back to Duty

K6: Methodologies for user research and data collection to understand user needs, pain points, opportunities and areas that should be prioritised. Back to Duty

K7: Ideation tools and techniques to developing potential solutions. Back to Duty

K8: Methodologies to evaluate prototypes and ideas. Back to Duty

K9: Continued improvement of a service, using iterative and agile approaches. Back to Duty

K10: Methods and tools for working collaboratively with groups, teams, and individuals. Back to Duty

K11: Project management and agile principles and methods. Back to Duty

K12: Approaches to change management. Back to Duty

K13: Tools and techniques for prioritisation. Back to Duty

K14: Techniques for measuring cost, value, risk, and impact of decisions Back to Duty

K15: Use of current and emerging technologies to inform the design of services. Back to Duty

K16: Principles of design and research ethics for service design. Back to Duty

K17: Equity, justice, diversity, and inclusion and how they impact on outcomes for people and organisations. Back to Duty

K18: Relevant regulatory and legislative requirements such as data protection, GDPR, confidentiality, for the handling and processing of data and its application during a project. Back to Duty

K19: How a service designer can contribute to a service becoming more environmentally sustainable. Back to Duty

K20: How to support the continuous development requirements and training and learning needs of people they work with. Back to Duty

K21: Organisation structures; business modelling; global and horizon scanning perspectives; governance and accountability; technological and policy implications. Back to Duty

Skills

S1: Champion and advocate the benefits of service design and user centred solutions. Back to Duty

S2: Interpret, analyse, and challenge a design brief. Back to Duty

S3: Systematically analyse and apply problem-solving techniques to complex service design challenges. Back to Duty

S4: Use service design methods to design new propositions, products, and services, and improve existing ones. Back to Duty

S5: Co-design, workshop, and facilitation of service design activities with stakeholders and users. Back to Duty

S6: Map the current and future states of a service journey collating information from multiple sources to form a single view of the service. Back to Duty

S7: Select, formulate and apply qualitative and quantitative user research methods and approaches. Back to Duty

S8: Analyse and evaluate findings from qualitative and quantitative research methods to understand and prioritise user needs. Back to Duty

S9: Evaluate arguments, assumptions, abstract concepts, and data to make judgements, and develop questions to achieve a solution to a problem. Back to Duty

S10: Select and use ideation methods to generate multiple solutions to complex problems. Back to Duty

S11: Prioritise potential solutions to select which to take forward to further development. Back to Duty

S12: Prototype concepts and solutions from low to high degrees of fidelity. Back to Duty

S13: Evaluate prototype solutions, selecting the most appropriate methodology. Back to Duty

S14: Select, formulate and apply a range of user testing methods to ensure any service changes create the desired impact. Back to Duty

S15: Apply user-centred design processes to iteratively develop concepts and solutions. Back to Duty

S16: Evaluate solutions in place to continually improve the service for users and stakeholders. Back to Duty

S17: Critically analyse, interpret and evaluate complex information and concepts. Back to Duty

S18: Communicate complex information, concepts and ideas adapting for different audiences. Back to Duty

S19: Influence, negotiate and challenge stakeholders in the delivery and decision-making process. Back to Duty

S20: Considers multiple viewpoints including those of the internal stakeholders, service users and service providers. Back to Duty

S21: Work with multidisciplinary teams. Back to Duty

S22: Work ethically and sustainably, to ensure research and design activities are carried out to the highest practice in ethical standards. Back to Duty

S23: Manage project to timescales and budget requirements. Back to Duty

S24: Identify and apply emerging industry developments to continuously improve service design practice. Back to Duty

S25: Provide support, specialist advice, and guidance. Back to Duty

S26: Identify the training requirements for their teams and stakeholders. Back to Duty

Behaviours

B1: Role models ethical behaviour and practices. Back to Duty

B2: Considers the “big” picture and the detail together. Back to Duty

B3: Works flexibly and adapts to circumstances. Back to Duty

B4: Seeks learning opportunities and continuous professional development. Back to Duty

B5: Takes responsibility, shows initiative, and is organised. Back to Duty

B6: Championing the user and putting them at the centre of the design process Back to Duty


Qualifications

English and Maths

Apprentices without level 2 English and maths will need to achieve this level prior to taking the End-Point Assessment. For those with an education, health and care plan or a legacy statement, the apprenticeship’s English and maths minimum requirement is Entry Level 3. A British Sign Language (BSL) qualification is an alternative to the English qualification for those whose primary language is BSL.
Print EPA plan

End-point assessment plan

Introduction and overview

This document explains the requirements for end-point assessment (EPA) for the service designer apprenticeship. End-point assessment organisations (EPAOs) must follow this when designing and delivering the EPA.

Service designer apprentices, their employers and training providers should read this document.

An approved EPAO must conduct the EPA for this apprenticeship. Employers must select an approved EPAO from the Education and Skills Funding Agency’s Register of end-point assessment organisations (RoEPAO).

A full-time apprentice typically spends 24 months on-programme (this means in training before the gateway) working towards competence as a service designer. All apprentices must spend at least 12 months on-programme. All apprentices must complete the required amount of off-the-job training specified by the apprenticeship funding rules.

This EPA has 2 assessment methods.

The grades available for each assessment method are:

Assessment method 1 - work based project with presentation and questioning:

  • fail
  • pass
  • distinction

Assessment method 2 - professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence:

  • fail
  • pass
  • distinction

The result from each assessment method is combined to decide the overall apprenticeship grade. The following grades are available for the apprenticeship:

  • fail
  • pass
  • distinction

EPA summary table

On-programme (typically 24 months)
The apprentice must complete training to develop the knowledge, skills and behaviours (KSBs) of the occupational standard.

The apprentice must complete training towards English and maths qualifications in line with the apprenticeship funding rules.

End-point assessment gateway
The employer must be content that the apprentice is working at or above the occupational standard.

The apprentice’s employer must confirm that they think the apprentice:

  • is working at or above the occupational standard as a service designer
  • has the evidence required to pass the gateway and is ready to take the EPA

The apprentice must have achieved English and maths qualifications in line with the apprenticeship funding rules.

For the work based project with presentation and questioning, the apprentice must submit the following supporting material: scoping document for work based project requirements. To ensure the project allows the apprentice to meet the KSBs mapped to this assessment method to the highest available grade, the EPAO should sign-off the project’s title and scope at the gateway to confirm it is suitable. A brief project summary must be submitted to the EPAO. It should be no more than 500 words. This needs to show that the project will provide the opportunity for the apprentice to cover the KSBs mapped to this assessment method. It is not assessed.

The apprentice must submit any policies and procedures as requested by the EPAO.

End-point assessment (typically 6 months)
Grades available for each assessment method:

Work based project with presentation and questioning

  • fail
  • pass
  • distinction

Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence

  • fail
  • pass
  • distinction

Overall EPA and apprenticeship can be graded:

    • fail
    • pass
    • distinction
Re-sits and re-takes



  • Re-take and re-sit grade cap: pass
  • Re-sit timeframe: typically 2 months
  • Re-take timeframe: typically 3 months

Duration of end-point assessment period

The EPA will be taken within the EPA period. The EPA period begins when the EPAO confirms the gateway requirements are met and is typically 6 months.

The expectation is that the EPAO will confirm the gateway requirements are met and the EPA begins as quickly as possible.

EPA gateway

The apprentice’s employer must confirm that they think their apprentice is working at or above the occupational standard. The apprentice will then enter the gateway. The employer may take advice from the apprentice's training provider(s), but the employer must make the decision.

The apprentice must meet the gateway requirements before starting their EPA.

These are:

  • achieved English and maths qualifications in line with the apprenticeship funding rules
  • for the work based project with presentation and questioning the apprentice must submit Scoping document for work based project

· the apprentice must agree the subject, title and scope for their project proposal with their employer and EPAO by submitting a scoping document which will be no more than 500 words.

  • for the professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence the apprentice must submit Portfolio of evidence

Portfolio of evidence requirements:

Apprentices must compile a portfolio of evidence during the on-programme period of the apprenticeship. It should contain evidence related to the KSBs that will be assessed by this assessment method. The portfolio of evidence will typically contain 18 discrete pieces of evidence. Evidence should be mapped against the KSBs.

Evidence may be used to demonstrate more than one KSB; a qualitative as opposed to quantitative approach is suggested. Evidence sources may include:

  • workplace documentation/records, for example:
    • workplace policies/procedures, records
    • witness statements
    • annotated photographs
    • video clips (maximum total duration 5 minutes); the apprentice must be in view and identifiable

This is not a definitive list; other evidence sources can be included.

The portfolio should not include reflective accounts or any methods of self-assessment. Any employer contributions should focus on direct observation of performance (for example witness statements) rather than opinions. The evidence provided should be valid and attributable to the apprentice; the portfolio of evidence should contain a statement from the employer and apprentice confirming this.

The EPAO should not assess the portfolio of evidence directly as it underpins the discussion. Independent assessors should review the portfolio of evidence to prepare questions for the discussion assessment method. They are not required to provide feedback after this review.

The apprentice must submit any policies and procedures as requested by the EPAO.

Assessment methods

The assessment methods can be delivered in any order.

The result of one assessment method does not need to be known before starting the next.

Work based project with presentation and questioning

Overview

A project involves the apprentice completing a significant and defined piece of work that has a real business application and benefit. The project must start after the apprentice has gone through the gateway.

The work based project with presentation and questioning must be structured to give the apprentice the opportunity to demonstrate the KSBs mapped to this EPA method to the highest available grade.

The project must meet the needs of the employer’s business and be relevant to the apprentice’s occupation and apprenticeship. The EPAO must confirm that it provides the apprentice with the opportunity to demonstrate the KSBs mapped to this EPA method to the highest available grade. The EPAO must refer to the grading descriptors to ensure that projects are pitched appropriately.

This EPA method includes 2 components:

  • project with a project output
  • presentation with questions and answers

The project and any components must be assessed holistically by the independent assessor when they are deciding the grade for this EPA method.

Rationale

This EPA method is being used because:

  • The work-based project is the most valid method as it allows the demonstration of professional competence. The project will contribute to the employer’s business and be part of the apprentices’ everyday work, ensuring that they can demonstrate the KSBs in practice. Producing a report reflects normal practice in the workplace for a Service Designer, so this assessment method is appropriate.
  • It is a significant and complex piece of work that thoroughly tests both higher and lower order knowledge and skills.
  • Note that it is essential that the project articulates the apprentice’s own work practice rather than the activities performed by the team of which they were part.

Component 1: Project with a project output

Delivery

Apprentices must complete a project which may be based on any of the following:

  • a specific problem
  • a recurring issue
  • an idea or opportunity.

The project may also be based on:

Examples of the types of projects an apprentice could submit:

  • Innovating how a reception area of a local council building can be improved to ensure it is inclusive to those who have additional needs such as reduced mobility or cognitive impairments.
  • Designing the checking-in process at an airport to meet user, worker and organisational needs taking into account the needs of different passengers and check in staff but also organisational needs for efficiency and security.
  • Transforming the interaction between a bank and its customers to ensure all customers regardless of their digital literacy can confidently access its services when they can no longer visit a branch.
  • Creating a new service to widen participation in elections by allowing people to register to vote via their mobile phones.

To ensure the project allows the apprentice to meet the KSBs mapped to this EPA method to the highest available grade, the EPAO should sign-off the project’s title and scope at the gateway to confirm it is suitable.

The project output must be in the form of a report.

The apprentice must start the project after the gateway. They must complete and submit the report to the EPAO after a maximum of 12 weeks. The employer should ensure the apprentice has the time and resources within this period, to plan and complete their project. The apprentice must complete their project and the production of all its components unaided.

The apprentice may work as part of a team which could include technical internal or external support. However, the project output must be the apprentice’s own work and will be reflective of their own role and contribution. The apprentice and their employer must confirm that the project output(s) is the apprentice’s own work when it is submitted.

The report must include at least:

The apprentice will complete their project and submit it to the EPAO after a maximum of 12 weeks from the gateway. The written project report and the presentation will be submitted to the EPAO together, 2 weeks prior to the presentation taking place.

The project report has a maximum word count of 4000 words. A tolerance of 10% above or below the word count is allowed at the apprentice’s discretion. Appendices, references and diagrams are not included in this total. The project report must map, in an appendix, how it evidences the relevant KSBs mapped to this EPA method.

Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence

Overview

In the professional discussion, an independent assessor and apprentice have a formal two-way conversation. It gives the apprentice the opportunity to demonstrate their competency across the KSBs as shown in the mapping.

Rationale

This EPA method is being used because:

  • it allows the apprentice to be assessed against KSBs that may not naturally occur as part of a work-based project
  • it allows the apprentice to show case their depth of understanding relating to the KSBs
  • it allows the independent assessor to consider the context and sector that the apprentice operates within, giving flexibility to ensure that all the KSBs can be assessed appropriately
  • it is cost effective, and it allows consideration of the potential need to conduct the EPA remotely.

Delivery

The professional discussion must be structured to give the apprentice the opportunity to demonstrate the KSBs mapped to this EPA method to the highest available grade.

The purpose of the independent assessor's questions will be to further clarify skills demonstrated in a portfolio of evidence.

The EPAO must give an apprentice 2 weeks notice of the professional discussion.

The independent assessor must have at least 2 week(s) to review the supporting documentation.

Apprentices must have access to their portfolio of evidence during the professional discussion.

Apprentices can refer to and illustrate their answers with evidence from their portfolio of evidence, however the portfolio of evidence is not directly assessed.

The professional discussion must last for 60 minutes. The independent assessor can increase the time of the professional discussion by up to 10%. This time is to allow the apprentice to respond to a question if necessary.

For the professional discussion, the independent assessor must ask at least 8 questions. Follow-up questions are allowed. The independent assessor must use the questions from the EPAO’s question bank or create their own questions in-line with the EPAO’s training. The professional discussion must allow the apprentice the opportunity to demonstrate the KSBs mapped to this EPA method at the highest possible grade.

The independent assessor conducts and assesses the professional discussion.

The independent assessor must keep accurate records of the assessment. The records must include the KSBs met, the grade achieved and answers to questions.

The independent assessor will make all grading decisions.

Assessment location

The professional discussion must take place in a suitable venue selected by the EPAO (for example the EPAO’s or employer’s premises).

The professional discussion can be conducted by video conferencing. The EPAO must have processes in place to verify the identity of the apprentice and ensure the apprentice is not being aided.

The professional discussion should take place in a quiet room, free from distractions and influence.

Question and resource development

EPAOs must write an assessment specification and question bank. The specification must be relevant to the occupation and demonstrate how to assess the KSBs shown in the mapping. It is recommended this is done in consultation with employers of this occupation. EPAOs should maintain the security and confidentiality of EPA materials when consulting employers. The questions must be unpredictable. A question bank of sufficient size will support this. The assessment specification and questions must be reviewed at least once a year to ensure they remain fit-for-purpose.

EPAOs must develop purpose-built question banks and ensure that appropriate quality assurance procedures are in place, for example, considering standardisation, training and moderation. EPAOs must ensure that questions are refined and developed to a high standard.

EPAOs must ensure that apprentices have a different set of questions in the case of re-sits or re-takes.

EPAOs must produce the following materials to support the professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence:

  • independent assessor assessment materials which include:
    • training materials
    • administration materials
    • moderation and standardisation materials
    • guidance materials
    • grading guidance
    • question bank
  • EPA guidance for the apprentice and employer

Grading

Work based project with presentation and questioning

Fail - does not meet pass criteria

Theme
KSBs
Pass
Apprentices must demonstrate all the pass descriptors
Distinction
Apprentices must demonstrate all the pass descriptors and all of the distinction descriptors
Theoretical approaches and methodology in design work
K4 K7 K13 K15 S3 S4 S12 S15

Selects and applies the appropriate creative processes, ideation tools and techniques, together with new and emerging technologies, to develop user centred design concepts and solutions. (K4, K7, K13, K15, S4, S15)

Selects and applies appropriate problem-solving techniques when developing and prototyping concepts and solutions from low to high degrees of fidelity. (S3, S12)

 

 

 

Justifies the tools used to develop solutions and recommend new technologies to support the use of them. (K7, K15)

Critically analyses their choice of problem solving techniques and how they provide recommended solutions. (S3, S12)

Data and research methods
K6 S7

Selects and applies appropriate methodologies for user research and data collection and interprets data to validly understand and prioritise user needs. (K6, S7)

Critically analyses conclusions with reference to supporting evidence. (K6, S7)

 

Evaluation
K8 K14 S8 S9 S13 S17

Critically analyses and evaluates user research data findings, including complex information and concepts, to prioritise user needs. (S8, S17)

Evaluates cost, value, risk and impact of proposed design solutions and explains how to measure the impact of their decisions when making judgements and developing solutions. (K14, S9)

Selects and applies suitable methodologies to evaluate prototypes and ideas. (K8, S13)

Develops and critically analyses hypotheses to test via prototype solutions. (S9, S13)

Working with and supporting others
K3 K10 S21 S25

Evaluates the benefits and limitations of including other business areas and professions into the project. (K3) 

Analyses how they have worked with the multidisciplinary teams, utilising methods and tools for collaborative working, and provided support, specialist advice, and guidance throughout the project. (K10, S21, S25)

N/A

Project and change management
K11 S2 S23 B5

Applies appropriate techniques to challenge a design brief in order to accurately interpret user requirements. (S2) 

Applies appropriate project management and agile principles and methods to effectively deliver a design solution that validly meets the requirements of the brief, taking responsibility for the project and showing initiative. (K11, S23, B5)

N/A

Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence

Fail - does not meet pass criteria

Theme
KSBs
Pass
Apprentices must demonstrate all the pass descriptors
Distinction
Apprentices must demonstrate all the pass descriptors and all of the distinction descriptors
Designing equitable, fair and sustainable services
K17 K18 K19 S22 B1 B6

Evaluates how they have incorporated equity, justice, diversity and inclusion principles into their work and how this have impacted on outcomes for stakeholders. (K17)

Evaluates how their role has contributed to the development of environmentally sustainable services. (K19)

Evaluates how they have ensured compliance with regulatory and legislative requirements within their role. (K18)

Evaluates how they have applied ethical and sustainable practices within their role whilst continuing to champion the user at the centre of the process. (S22, B1, B6)

Critically analyses their selection of ethical and sustainable practices with reference to how these have ensured that the user is at the centre of the design process. (S22, B6)

 

Theoretical approaches and methodology in design work
K1 K2 K5 K9 S6 S10 S11 S24 B2

Analyses how they have effectively used the discipline of service design and emerging industry developments to improve service design practice. (K1, K2, K9, S24)

Analyses how they have used particular ideation methods to generate multiple solutions for complex problems, and their approach to prioritisation to develop these further. (S10, S11)

Evaluates how they have effectively mapped the states of a service journey with consideration for both the big picture and the user requirements. (K5, S6, B2)

Critically analyses ideation methods used and evaluates potential solutions to complex problems in order to make recommendations for the continuous improvement of services. (K9, S10)

Data and research methods
K16 K21 S14

Articulates the principles of design and research ethics and how these are used when selecting and applying user testing methods, analysing how they create the desired impact. (K16, S14)  

Analyses the relationship between business modelling and horizon scanning and technological and policy implications and  governance and accountability. (K21)

 

Critically analyses their selection and application of user testing methods and why others were not suitable. (S14)

Evaluation
S16

Evaluates solutions in order to continually improve the service for users and stakeholders. (S16)

Critiques actions taken to improve services and justifies their recommendations and the impact on users and stakeholders. (S16)

Working with and supporting others
K20 S1 S5 S18 S19 S20 S26 B4

Articulates how they support and develop their team through identifying needs, supporting the development of training materials and activities and acting as a positive role model, explaining the benefits this has for individuals and the organisation. (K20, S26)

Evaluates how to champion the benefits of service design, and the approaches used to communicate complex information to stakeholders, and how they have used these to co-design and facilitate activities. (S1, S5, S18)

Analyses multiple view points of stakeholders and justifies their use of these to influence, negotiate and challenge during the delivery and decision making processes of a project. (S19, S20)

Explains how they identify and seek out learning opportunities for continuous professional development. (B4)

Critically analyses the communication methods used to present their findings and ideas and why others were not suitable. (S18)  

Justifies the advantages and limitations of the approach they took when challenging stakeholders and how this influenced the decision-making process. (S19)

Project management
K12 B3

Critiques the approaches to change management and how they use these to maintain flexibility when adapting to changing circumstances while continuing to meet deadlines. (K12, B3)

N/A

Overall EPA grading

Performance in the EPA determines the apprenticeship grade of:

  • fail
  • pass
  • distinction

An independent assessor must individually grade the assessment methods in line with this EPA plan.

The EPAO must combine the individual assessment method grades to determine the overall EPA grade.

If the apprentice fails one or more assessment methods, they will be awarded an overall fail. 

To achieve an overall pass, the apprentice must achieve at least a pass in all the assessment methods.

To achieve an overall distinction, the apprentice must achieve a distinction in both assessment methods.

Grades from individual assessment methods must be combined in the following way to determine the grade of the EPA overall.

Work based project with presentation and questioning Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence Overall Grading
Fail Any grade Fail
Any grade Fail Fail
Pass Pass Pass
Pass Distinction Pass
Distinction Pass Pass
Distinction Distinction Distinction

Re-sits and re-takes

An apprentice who fails one or more assessment method(s) can take a re-sit or a re-take at their employer’s discretion. The apprentice’s employer needs to agree that a re-sit or re-take is appropriate. A re-sit does not need further learning, whereas a re-take does.

An apprentice should have a supportive action plan to prepare for a re-sit or a re-take.

The employer and EPAO agree the timescale for a re-sit or re-take. A re-sit is typically taken within 2 months of the EPA outcome notification. The timescale for a re-take is dependent on how much re-training is required and is typically taken within 3 months of the EPA outcome notification.

Failed assessment methods must be re-sat or re-taken within a 6-month period from the EPA outcome notification, otherwise the entire EPA will need to be re-sat or re-taken in full.

Re-sits and re-takes are not offered to an apprentice wishing to move from pass to a higher grade.

An apprentice will get a maximum EPA grade of pass for a re-sit or re-take, unless the EPAO determines there are exceptional circumstances.

Roles and responsibilities

Roles Responsibilities

Apprentice

As a minimum, the apprentice should:

  • participate in and complete on-programme training to meet the KSBs as outlined in the occupational standard for a minimum of 12 months
  • complete the required amount of off-the-job training specified by the apprenticeship funding rules and as arranged by the employer and training provider
  • understand the purpose and importance of EPA
  • meet the gateway requirements 
  • undertake the EPA  

 

Employer

As a minimum, the apprentice's employer must:

  • select the EPAO and training provider 
  • work with the training provider (where applicable) to support the apprentice in the workplace and to provide the opportunities for the apprentice to develop the KSBs
  • arrange and support off-the-job training to be undertaken by the apprentice 
  • decide when the apprentice is working at or above the occupational standard and is ready for EPA 
  • ensure that supporting evidence required at the gateway is submitted in line with this EPA plan 
  • liaise with the training provider and EPAO to ensure the EPA is booked in a timely manner

Post-gateway, the employer must: 

  • confirm arrangements with the EPAO for the EPA (who, when, where) in a timely manner (including providing access to any employer-specific documentation as required, for example company policies)
  • ensure that the EPA is scheduled with the EPAO for a date and time which allows the opportunity for the apprentice to be assessed against the KSBs 
  • remain independent from the delivery of the EPA
  • ensure the apprentice is given sufficient time away from regular duties to prepare for, and complete all post-gateway elements of the EPA, and that any required supervision during this time (as stated within this EPA plan) is in place
  • where the apprentice is assessed in the workplace, ensure that the apprentice has access to the resources used on a regular basis 
  • pass the certificate to the apprentice upon receipt from the EPAO

EPAO

As a minimum, the EPAO must:  

  • conform to the requirements of this EPA plan and deliver its requirements in a timely manner 
  • conform to the requirements of the register of end-point assessment organisations (RoEPAO) 
  • conform to the requirements of the external quality assurance provider (EQAP) for this apprenticeship 
  • understand the occupational standard 
  • make the EPA contractual arrangements, including agreeing the price of the EPA 
  • develop and produce assessment materials as detailed for each assessment method in this EPA plan 
  • appoint qualified and competent independent assessors in line with the requirements of this EPA plan to conduct assessments and oversee their working 
  • appoint administrators (and invigilators where required) to administer the EPA  
  • provide training for independent assessors in terms of good assessment practice, operating the assessment tools and grading 
  • provide information, advice, guidance and documentation to enable apprentices, employers and training providers to prepare for the EPA 
  • confirm all gateway requirements have been met as quickly as possible 
  • arrange for the EPA to take place, in consultation with the employer 
  • ensure that the apprentice has access to the required resources and liaise with the employer to agree this if necessary, where the apprentice is not assessed in the workplace 
  • develop and provide assessment recording documentation to ensure a clear and auditable process is in place for providing assessment decisions and feedback to stakeholders 
  • have no direct connection with the apprentice, their employer or training provider in all instances; there must be no conflict of interest 
  • have policies and procedures for internal quality assurance (IQA), and maintain records of IQA activity and moderation for external quality assurance (EQA) purposes 
  • deliver induction training for independent assessors, and for invigilators and markers (where used) 
  • undertake standardisation activity on this apprenticeship for an independent assessor before they conduct an EPA for the first time, if the EPA is updated and periodically (a minimum of annually) 
  • manage invigilation of the apprentice to maintain security of the assessment in line with the EPAO’s malpractice policy 
  • verify the identity of the apprentice  
  • use language in the development and delivery of the EPA that is appropriate to the level of the occupational standard 

Independent assessor

As a minimum, an independent assessor must: 

  • have the competence to assess the apprentice at the level of this apprenticeship and hold any required qualifications and experience in line with the requirements of the independent assessor as detailed in the IQA section of this EPA plan 
  • understand the occupational standard and the requirements of this EPA 
  • have, maintain and be able to evidence, up-to-date knowledge and expertise of the occupation 
  • deliver the end-point assessment in-line with this EPA plan 
  • comply with the IQA requirements of the EPAO 
  • have no direct connection or conflict of interest with the apprentice, their employer or training provider; in all instances; there must be no conflict of interest 
  • attend induction training 
  • attend standardisation events when they start working for the EPAO, before they conduct an EPA for the first time and a minimum of annually for this apprenticeship  
  • assess each assessment method, as determined by the EPA plan  
  • assess the KSBs assigned to each assessment method, as shown in the mapping of KSBs to assessment methods in this EPA plan  
  • make the grading decisions 
  • record and report assessment outcome decisions, for each apprentice, following instructions and using assessment recording documentation provided by the EPAO, in a timely manner 
  • use language in the development and delivery of the EPA that is appropriate to the level of the occupational standard 
  • mark open (constructed) test answers accurately according to the EPAO’s mark scheme and procedures 

Training provider

As a minimum, the training provider must: 

  • work with the employer and support the apprentice during the off-the-job training to provide the opportunities to develop the KSBs as listed in the occupational standard 
  • conduct training covering the KSBs agreed as part of the Commitment Statement or the Individual Learning Plan 
  • monitor the apprentice’s progress during any training provider led on-programme learning 
  • advise the employer, upon request, on the apprentice’s readiness for EPA 
  • remain independent from the delivery of the EPA 

Reasonable adjustments

The EPAO must have reasonable adjustments arrangements for the EPA.

This should include:

  • how an apprentice qualifies for reasonable adjustment
  • what reasonable adjustments may be made

Adjustments must maintain the validity, reliability and integrity of the EPA as outlined in this EPA plan.

Internal quality assurance

Internal quality assurance refers to how EPAOs ensure valid, consistent and reliable EPA decisions. EPAOs must adhere to the requirements within the roles and responsibilities section and:

  • have effective and rigorous quality assurance systems and procedures that ensure fair, reliable and consistent EPA regardless of employer, place, time or independent assessor
  • appoint independent assessors who are competent to deliver the EPA and who:
    • have recent relevant experience of the occupation or sector to at least occupational level 6 gained in the last 3 years or significant experience of the occupation or sector
  • operate induction training for anyone involved in the delivery and/or assessment of the EPA
  • provide training for independent assessors in good assessment practice, operating the assessment tools and making grading decisions
  • provide ongoing training for markers and invigilators
  • provide standardisation activity for this apprenticeship standard for all independent assessors:
    • before they conduct an EPA for the first time
    • if the EPA is updated
    • periodically as appropriate (a minimum of annually)
  • conduct effective moderation of EPA decisions and grades
  • conduct appeals where required, according to the EPAO’s appeals procedure, reviewing and making final decisions on EPA decisions and grades
  • have no direct connection with the apprentice, their employer or training provider. In all instances, including when the EPAO is the training provider (for example a higher education institution)

Value for money

Affordability of the EPA will be aided by using at least some of the following:

  • utilising digital remote platforms to conduct applicable assessment methods
  • using the employer’s premises
  • conducting assessment methods on the same day

Professional recognition

Professional body recognition is not relevant to this occupational apprenticeship.

Mapping of KSBs to assessment methods

Knowledge Assessment methods
K1

The theory and history of the discipline of service design, including definitions and principles, the different perspectives, approaches, or schools of thought.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K2

How and when service design practices can be used to design and improve services.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K3

Other business areas and professions involved in the design of services such as research, UX, technology, policy, and delivery.

Back to Grading
Work based project with presentation and questioning
K4

The use of creative processes involved in design such as user-centred design approaches and design thinking methods.

Back to Grading
Work based project with presentation and questioning
K5

Approaches to mapping a service and when to use them.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K6

Methodologies for user research and data collection to understand user needs, pain points, opportunities and areas that should be prioritised.

Back to Grading
Work based project with presentation and questioning
K7

Ideation tools and techniques to developing potential solutions.

Back to Grading
Work based project with presentation and questioning
K8

Methodologies to evaluate prototypes and ideas.

Back to Grading
Work based project with presentation and questioning
K9

Continued improvement of a service, using iterative and agile approaches.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K10

Methods and tools for working collaboratively with groups, teams, and individuals.

Back to Grading
Work based project with presentation and questioning
K11

Project management and agile principles and methods.

Back to Grading
Work based project with presentation and questioning
K12

Approaches to change management.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K13

Tools and techniques for prioritisation.

Back to Grading
Work based project with presentation and questioning
K14

Techniques for measuring cost, value, risk, and impact of decisions

Back to Grading
Work based project with presentation and questioning
K15

Use of current and emerging technologies to inform the design of services.

Back to Grading
Work based project with presentation and questioning
K16

Principles of design and research ethics for service design.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K17

Equity, justice, diversity, and inclusion and how they impact on outcomes for people and organisations.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K18

Relevant regulatory and legislative requirements such as data protection, GDPR, confidentiality, for the handling and processing of data and its application during a project.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K19

How a service designer can contribute to a service becoming more environmentally sustainable.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K20

How to support the continuous development requirements and training and learning needs of people they work with.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
K21

Organisation structures; business modelling; global and horizon scanning perspectives; governance and accountability; technological and policy implications.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
Skill Assessment methods
S1

Champion and advocate the benefits of service design and user centred solutions.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
S2

Interpret, analyse, and challenge a design brief.

Back to Grading
Work based project with presentation and questioning
S3

Systematically analyse and apply problem-solving techniques to complex service design challenges.

Back to Grading
Work based project with presentation and questioning
S4

Use service design methods to design new propositions, products, and services, and improve existing ones.

Back to Grading
Work based project with presentation and questioning
S5

Co-design, workshop, and facilitation of service design activities with stakeholders and users.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
S6

Map the current and future states of a service journey collating information from multiple sources to form a single view of the service.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
S7

Select, formulate and apply qualitative and quantitative user research methods and approaches.

Back to Grading
Work based project with presentation and questioning
S8

Analyse and evaluate findings from qualitative and quantitative research methods to understand and prioritise user needs.

Back to Grading
Work based project with presentation and questioning
S9

Evaluate arguments, assumptions, abstract concepts, and data to make judgements, and develop questions to achieve a solution to a problem.

Back to Grading
Work based project with presentation and questioning
S10

Select and use ideation methods to generate multiple solutions to complex problems.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
S11

Prioritise potential solutions to select which to take forward to further development.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
S12

Prototype concepts and solutions from low to high degrees of fidelity.

Back to Grading
Work based project with presentation and questioning
S13

Evaluate prototype solutions, selecting the most appropriate methodology.

Back to Grading
Work based project with presentation and questioning
S14

Select, formulate and apply a range of user testing methods to ensure any service changes create the desired impact.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
S15

Apply user-centred design processes to iteratively develop concepts and solutions.

Back to Grading
Work based project with presentation and questioning
S16

Evaluate solutions in place to continually improve the service for users and stakeholders.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
S17

Critically analyse, interpret and evaluate complex information and concepts.

Back to Grading
Work based project with presentation and questioning
S18

Communicate complex information, concepts and ideas adapting for different audiences.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
S19

Influence, negotiate and challenge stakeholders in the delivery and decision-making process.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
S20

Considers multiple viewpoints including those of the internal stakeholders, service users and service providers.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
S21

Work with multidisciplinary teams.

Back to Grading
Work based project with presentation and questioning
S22

Work ethically and sustainably, to ensure research and design activities are carried out to the highest practice in ethical standards.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
S23

Manage project to timescales and budget requirements.

Back to Grading
Work based project with presentation and questioning
S24

Identify and apply emerging industry developments to continuously improve service design practice.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
S25

Provide support, specialist advice, and guidance.

Back to Grading
Work based project with presentation and questioning
S26

Identify the training requirements for their teams and stakeholders.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
Behaviour Assessment methods
B1

Role models ethical behaviour and practices.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
B2

Considers the “big” picture and the detail together.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
B3

Works flexibly and adapts to circumstances.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
B4

Seeks learning opportunities and continuous professional development.

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence
B5

Takes responsibility, shows initiative, and is organised.

Back to Grading
Work based project with presentation and questioning
B6

Championing the user and putting them at the centre of the design process

Back to Grading
Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence

Mapping of KSBs to grade themes

Work based project with presentation and questioning - Project

KSBS GROUPED BY THEME Knowledge Skills Behaviour
Theoretical approaches and methodology in design work
K4 K7 K13 K15
S3 S4 S12 S15

The use of creative processes involved in design such as user-centred design approaches and design thinking methods. (K4)

Ideation tools and techniques to developing potential solutions. (K7)

Tools and techniques for prioritisation. (K13)

Use of current and emerging technologies to inform the design of services. (K15)

Systematically analyse and apply problem-solving techniques to complex service design challenges. (S3)

Use service design methods to design new propositions, products, and services, and improve existing ones. (S4)

Prototype concepts and solutions from low to high degrees of fidelity. (S12)

Apply user-centred design processes to iteratively develop concepts and solutions. (S15)

N/A

Data and research methods
K6
S7

Methodologies for user research and data collection to understand user needs, pain points, opportunities and areas that should be prioritised. (K6)

Select, formulate and apply qualitative and quantitative user research methods and approaches. (S7)

N/A

Evaluation
K8 K14
S8 S9 S13 S17

Methodologies to evaluate prototypes and ideas. (K8)

Techniques for measuring cost, value, risk, and impact of decisions (K14)

Analyse and evaluate findings from qualitative and quantitative research methods to understand and prioritise user needs. (S8)

Evaluate arguments, assumptions, abstract concepts, and data to make judgements, and develop questions to achieve a solution to a problem. (S9)

Evaluate prototype solutions, selecting the most appropriate methodology. (S13)

Critically analyse, interpret and evaluate complex information and concepts. (S17)

N/A

Working with and supporting others
K3 K10
S21 S25

Other business areas and professions involved in the design of services such as research, UX, technology, policy, and delivery. (K3)

Methods and tools for working collaboratively with groups, teams, and individuals. (K10)

Work with multidisciplinary teams. (S21)

Provide support, specialist advice, and guidance. (S25)

N/A

Project and change management
K11
S2 S23
B5

Project management and agile principles and methods. (K11)

Interpret, analyse, and challenge a design brief. (S2)

Manage project to timescales and budget requirements. (S23)

Takes responsibility, shows initiative, and is organised. (B5)

Professional discussion underpinned by a portfolio of evidence - Discussion

KSBS GROUPED BY THEME Knowledge Skills Behaviour
Designing equitable, fair and sustainable services
K17 K18 K19
S22
B1 B6

Equity, justice, diversity, and inclusion and how they impact on outcomes for people and organisations. (K17)

Relevant regulatory and legislative requirements such as data protection, GDPR, confidentiality, for the handling and processing of data and its application during a project. (K18)

How a service designer can contribute to a service becoming more environmentally sustainable. (K19)

Work ethically and sustainably, to ensure research and design activities are carried out to the highest practice in ethical standards. (S22)

Role models ethical behaviour and practices. (B1)

Championing the user and putting them at the centre of the design process (B6)

Theoretical approaches and methodology in design work
K1 K2 K5 K9
S6 S10 S11 S24
B2

The theory and history of the discipline of service design, including definitions and principles, the different perspectives, approaches, or schools of thought. (K1)

How and when service design practices can be used to design and improve services. (K2)

Approaches to mapping a service and when to use them. (K5)

Continued improvement of a service, using iterative and agile approaches. (K9)

Map the current and future states of a service journey collating information from multiple sources to form a single view of the service. (S6)

Select and use ideation methods to generate multiple solutions to complex problems. (S10)

Prioritise potential solutions to select which to take forward to further development. (S11)

Identify and apply emerging industry developments to continuously improve service design practice. (S24)

Considers the “big” picture and the detail together. (B2)

Data and research methods
K16 K21
S14

Principles of design and research ethics for service design. (K16)

Organisation structures; business modelling; global and horizon scanning perspectives; governance and accountability; technological and policy implications. (K21)

Select, formulate and apply a range of user testing methods to ensure any service changes create the desired impact. (S14)

N/A

Evaluation

S16

N/A

Evaluate solutions in place to continually improve the service for users and stakeholders. (S16)

N/A

Working with and supporting others
K20
S1 S5 S18 S19 S20 S26
B4

How to support the continuous development requirements and training and learning needs of people they work with. (K20)

Champion and advocate the benefits of service design and user centred solutions. (S1)

Co-design, workshop, and facilitation of service design activities with stakeholders and users. (S5)

Communicate complex information, concepts and ideas adapting for different audiences. (S18)

Influence, negotiate and challenge stakeholders in the delivery and decision-making process. (S19)

Considers multiple viewpoints including those of the internal stakeholders, service users and service providers. (S20)

Identify the training requirements for their teams and stakeholders. (S26)

Seeks learning opportunities and continuous professional development. (B4)

Project management
K12

B3

Approaches to change management. (K12)

N/A

Works flexibly and adapts to circumstances. (B3)

Contact us about this apprenticeship

Employers involved in creating the standard: Quality Care Commission, Cabinet Office, Cambridge and Peterborough Councils, Citizens Advice, Cancer Research, Hackney Council, Girl Guides, Public Health England, Practical Service Design, Department for Education, Red Cross, HMRC, NHS, Snook, Adur and Worthing Councils

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